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Sands Bethworks: Transforming USA’s Largest Brownfield

Landscape Architects: SWA Group
Location: Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA
Date: 2008
Photography: Tom Fox / SWA

The former home of Bethlehem Steel, site of the EPA’s largest brownfield conversion plan in the nation, required further consideration to improve soil pH levels and storm water runoff in preparation for its new mixed-use tenants. Its redesign honors our country’s industrial heritage through preservation and adaptive reuse and provides a healthy, appealing environment for visitors. Most importantly, it has catalyzed a stunning revival of the South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, region.

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Nordhavn: a New City from an Industrial Past

Architects: COBESlethPolyform
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Size: 3.6 million m²
Renders:COBESlethPolyform and Rambøll
Photos: Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST

From a harbour area with free port status to a city with independent neighbourhoods, islets and canals. Nordhavn (The North Harbour) is currently being transformed into a new city district in Copenhagen by COBE, Sleth, Polyform and Rambøll.

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MFO Park: The North Zurich Parkscape

Architects: Raderschallpartner
Location: Zurich, Switzerland
Date: 2002
Photography: Michael Freisager

The park site was in use for roughly a century by the Oerlikon Machine Works (MFO). In the course of industrialisation the entire grounds were at one time filled in with construction debris, sand from the foundry and ash, and the plot had thus suffered from pollution. Together with nearby Oerliker Park, an enormous wooded area is now arising, created by the contiguous tops and trunks of countless ash trees. MFO Park responds to this in its own way with the “Park House”, a large open hall and a trellis overgrown with hundreds of blooming, aromatic climbers.

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Auckland Waterfront: Hybrid Uses for a Post-Industrial Harbour Promenade

Architects: Taylor Cullity Lethlean (TCL) in collaboration with Wraight + Associates (WA Landscape Architecture)
Location: Wynyard Quarter, Auckland Waterfront , New Zealand
Date: 2008- 2011
Size: 9 acres
Photography: Simon DevittJohn Davis, Simone Bliss

Doubtless, the strongest addition to Auckland’s waterfront is the completion of Jellicoe Harbour, Jellicoe Street, Silo Park and North Wharf Promenade encouraging a rich dialogue between working waterfronts and public space. An overlay of waterfront activities, previously removed from the public gaze, is now central to the public realm experience and integrated as an attraction via fishing fleet premises, as well as wholesale and retail fish and seafood markets. Auckland’s Waterfront is the first catalytic project of this redevelopment, and the public spaces are centred on Jellicoe Harbour and Silo Park. These spaces promote an alternative design approach to the typical erasure of waterfront memory. Here, friction is encouraged; smelly fish are the attraction, rust, grit and patina are embraced, and derelict artefacts are reprogrammed.

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New Lab Brooklyn: Innovative Nature of Green Research and Manufacturing Center

Architects: Marvel Architects
Location: Brooklyn Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York
Year: 2017

Expressing the innovative nature of this green research and manufacturing center and preserving the structure of the grand historic hangar that houses it is the concept behind the design of the New Lab at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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Museum of Steel: Turning Brownfield into Greenfield

Architects: Surfacedesign Inc.
Location: Monterrey, Mexico
Date: 2007
Photography: Paúl Rivera

A team of international designers collaborated to transform a decommissioned blast furnace and a brownfield site into a modern history museum dedicated to the region’s rich history of steel production. Borrowing from materials endemic to the site, innovative landscape design weaves together with modern architecture to usher an old relic into the 21st century. Environmentally sensitive technologies – such as green roofs and a storm water collection system – offer a new approach to the landscape while respecting the original context.

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