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The Plan[t] to Feed the City

Author: Matteo Robiglio
Excerpt from the book RE-USA: 20 American Stories of Adaptive Reuse
Project: The Plant (renewal of the Peer Foods factory)
Place: Chicago, USA
Photography: Matteo Robiglio

The conveyor rails once used to move slaughtered hogs are still hanging from the ceiling in the former Peer Foods factory – one of the last meatpacking plants to close in Chicago. It shut its doors in 2007. It was by observing something similar that Henry Ford, as he states in his 1922 autobiography My Life and Work, understood the potential of employing moving conveyor system and fixed work stations in manufacturing. If you could disassemble a hog this way, you could reverse the process and assemble a car.

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Silosamlingen: an Industrial Heritage for the New Artistic Hub

Architects: MX_SImestreswåge arquitectes
Location: Krisitansand, Norway
Size: Museum: 8.750 m2 | Performing arts school:  3.950 m2 | Hotel + incubator building: 64.50 m2

The international competition proposes the transformation of the city’s port area into an artistic hub. The site is overlooked by an old grain silo dating from 1935, one of the first in the country to be constructed with cylindrical cells made of reinforced concrete. The building is a modernist icon, praised by giants of architecture such as Walter Gropius or Le Corbusier, and will be incorporated into the new museum complex. The new facility is located next to the multi-award-winning Kilden auditorium and theatre, a project carried out by the young Finnish architecture firm ALA Architects, winner of the design competition for the new Helsinki Central Library.

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From Biscuits to Bits at Bakery Square

Author: Matteo Robiglio
Excerpt from the book RE-USA: 20 American Stories of Adaptive Reuse
Project: Bakery Square (renewal of the Nabisco factory)
Place: Pittsburgh, USA
Photography: Matteo Robiglio

The National Biscuit Company (Nabisco) factory on Penn Avenue, built in 1918, was part of a nationwide expansion plan. In-house architect Albert G. Zimmermann designed the new seven-story plant in compliance with the company’s values of style and worker dignity. Its large windows for natural lightning, showers and locker rooms for employees, and fireproof stairways made it a point of reference even before construction – it was already written about in 1912 and 1916. Other bakeries opened around Nabisco along and near Penn Avenue in the 1920s and 30s.

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